The Get Home Bag / Survival Kit. When The Bug Out Bag Is Infeasible.


Why A Get Home Bag / Survival Kit?

I always keep a smaller bag in my vehicle that will sustain me for at least 24 hours to possibly 48 hours and provide what I need to get me back to the house.This bag basically has a temporary food, water, shelter and fire starting source. To sustain me overnight if need be. This is in addition to my EDC my pistol, paracord bracelet, pocket knife and basic cigarette lighter, things I have on me at all times.

The Bug Out Bag is great if you have the room to keep it in your vehicle but that is not always an option. So the smaller get home bag survival kit is always going to be a better option for most. I work in remote areas in the back country of West Central Idaho and this is something I can quickly transfer from my personal vehicle to my work vehicle and have available if I get stuck in the backcountry overnight. Also the Get Home Bag isn’t quite as noticeable when your transferring items to and from your work vehicle. This way you avoid weird looks from your coworkers.

I also take it if I have to travel any distance on a daily basis. If I have to go to Challis which is four hours away through wilderness river roads or even to Boise which is closer by only a hour and thirty minutes away. Its a small kit I will always have with me.

Be sure to update your pack according to season, In the winter I add a military poncho and poncho liner “woobie” to the bottom of the bag, with the additional tie straps.

Also rotate your MRE’s out especially if it has been in your vehicle in hot weather as the shelf life decreases dramatically in Hot weather. So pull those MRE’s after summer and use them as soon as possible and replace with new ones in the fall.

The exploded view of the contents of my bag.

Contents

I use an older Vietnam era LBE ALICE butt pack. It’s small and will hold quite a lot of gear without being hugely cumbersome. It can attach to a belt with the ALICE clips or a strap can be attached and hung from the shoulder.

Shelter
  • A Coghlans Tube Tent.
  • A Emergency Space Blanket
Food
  • Two Stripped Down MRE’s
  • One Daltrex Emergency Ration
Water
  • A LifeStraw Water Filter “Filters up to 1000 liters”
Fire
  • Altoid Tin with Charcloth
  • Film Container with Vaseline Soaked Cotton
  • Magnesium Bar FireStarter
Miscellaneous
  • Fixed Blade Knife
  • Multi Tool
  • Extra Medications for Two Days
  • Survival Chain Saw
  • Flash Light
  • Chemlight
  • 12 feet of Additional Paracord
  • Hot Hands Hand Warmers
  • Knife Sharpener
  • Fluorescent Tape for Marking Navigation Waypoints
  • Additional 25 Rounds of 45 ACP Ammo
Things I Need To Add
  • Compass
  • Additional Batteries For FlashLight

I’m sure others may add or remove certain items and by no means is this the most comprehensive kit, but its what I feel I need to carry. Having a smaller get home bag will definitely be a plus when the Bug Out Bag is too big and cumbersome to carry on a daily basis. This is a basic small get home survival kit and in no way a 72 hour Bug Out Bag which contains way more as far as longterm survival items. That may be a subject of my Next blog.

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3 thoughts on “The Get Home Bag / Survival Kit. When The Bug Out Bag Is Infeasible.”

  1. Thank you for the article. I notice I carry more or less the same things in a small bag for the exact same reasons. One difference is that I carry a bright orange bandana. A bandana is very multi-purpose and covers everything from first aid to dust/smoke filtration, also serves as a pre-filter for water, dipped in water it can help cooling off and it being orange, I can use it as a mean of signalling.

    Thanks for your blog, I find it quite interesting!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes a bandana is a very useful part of kit, I do keep a couple military triangular bandages, the heavy OD green ones for a multitude of uses. Not so good for signalling because of the OD color, but I keep a few other items such as a strobe and signal mirror for that. Thanks for your comment!

      Like

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